Creating an Online Presence

by Anita Nolan | Last updated

            These days, many players create an online presence to get their information in front of college coaches.  Some send DVDs to coaches, but these tend to get misplaced and might not be seen.  An online résumé and video is a good alternative. 

            Several recruiting websites provide a place for players to create online résumés and videos and for coaches to view them.  A few of those are:  www.ncsasports.org, www.activerecruiting.com, www.berecruited.com, www.athleticscholarships.net, www.collegesportsscholarships.com, and www.soccerincollege.com

            Some of these websites charge a fee.  However, they offer the advantage of being a place where coaches go to look for players.  If you want to play in college, this can be a big advantage.  Coaches from schools you hadn’t considered might contact you after seeing your résumé on sites like these. 

             At a minimum, your team should have a website.  Information about the entire team, including schedule, tournament results, with perhaps an individual page for each player will provide a college coach with a lot of information on the competitiveness of your team.  And if all players include the team website in communications with coaches, the entire team will benefit by having more coaches look at the site and perhaps see info on another player who interests them.  The downside of only having a team website is that there will be no video of you attached.  However, you can start a YouTube Channel, link to it from your webpage on the team site, and keep it updated with your latest video.

            As an alternative to posting information on a recruiting website, or if your team doesn’t have a website, some players create their own website or post their information on a Facebook page.  If you choose to go this route, use your real name on the profile and in the URL if you can.  Be sure to include either a headshot or action shot of yourself.  Do NOT include your social security number or home address.  Use your email address as a way for a coach to get in contact with you. 

            Do include your name, city, high school and its address, your email address, graduation year, a list of extra-curricular activities, athletic accomplishments, and other sports you participate in.  Remember that the coach will want to see if you can be accepted to his school, so include your GPA, class rank if available, standardized test scores and academic achievements. 

            You’ll also want to include the names and contact information of your high school and club coaches, the win-loss records, current game schedule and results, and tournament or showcases you’ll participate in.  Include your team jersey colors and your jersey number to make it easier for coaches to identify you at a tournament.  Include video.  Update the information and video frequently.  You can begin building your website in your sophomore year. 

            The downside of having your own website, a page on the team website, or using Facebook is that only those coaches to whom you provide the URL are likely to visit.  It is much more difficult to get noticed by other coaches if you create your own website.

            Include your website address in all communications with coaches.  If your team has a website, be sure to include that as well.  Link to the team site from your own website and if the team site has a page dedicated to you, be sure to put your web address on it. 

            To create video content, some teams hire a videographer, but sometimes a parent videotapes several games and compiles the video themselves.  If that’s the case for you, be sure the games videotaped are competitive ones.  Show the entire sequence of play.  Films that only show finishing shots won’t provide a coach with the information what he needs.  He wants to see how the play develops, the way players position themselves, how they move, etc.  It helps to have a photo or a little footage of yourself in uniform for the first few seconds of the video so the coach knows what you look like.  Be sure he has a way to identify you on the videotape (stopping the tape and inserting an arrow that points to you or circling your image on the video momentarily will do the trick) at the beginning of each play sequence. 

             Marketing yourself requires time and effort, but the rewards of making and fitting in well on a college team are priceless.

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